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Directing the ERP implementation : a best practice guide to avoiding program failure traps while tuning system performance / Michael W. Pelphrey.

By: Material type: TextTextLanguage: English Series: Series on resource managementPublisher: Boca Raton : Distributor: CRC Press, Copyright date: ©2015Edition: 1a ediciónDescription: xxix, 350 páginas : ilustraciones ; 26 x 19 cmContent type:
  • text
Media type:
  • sin medio
Carrier type:
  • volumen
ISBN:
  • 9781482248418
Subject(s): DDC classification:
  • 658.4/038011 23
LOC classification:
  • T 58.6 P45 2015
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: 1.Creating a Project Plan -- 1.1.Planning Roadmap of Deliverables -- 1.1.1.High-Level Acceptance Criteria (Acceptl) -- 1.1.2.End-Point System Expected Results (ToBeResult2) -- 1.1.3.Rules of Engagement (RulesOfEngage3) -- 1.1.4.Risk Management Plan (RiskMgmt4) -- 1.1.5.Quality Assurance Plan (QA5) -- 1.1.6.Requirements Management Plan (RqmtsMgmt6) -- 1.1.7.Configuration Management Plan (CM7) -- 1.1.8.Training Plan (TrainingPln8) -- 1.1.9.Collaboration Coordination Plan (CollabCoord9) -- 1.1.10.Project Health Reporting Plan (ProjHealth10) -- 1.1.11.User/System Documentation Plan (UserDoc11) -- 1.1.12.Knowledge Transfer Plan (KT12) -- 1.1.13.Communication Plan (Comm13) -- 1.1.14.Plan for Reviews (Toll Gates) and Walkthroughs (TollGatel4) -- 1.1.15.Contractor Agreement Management Plan (CAM15) -- 1.1.16.Test Strategy (Testingl6) -- 1.1.17.Business Information Assurance Plans (BIA17) -- 1.1.17.1.Information Systems Continuity Plan --
Note continued: 1.1.17.2.Fault-Tolerant Plan -- 1.1.18.Software Implementation Strategy (SWImplel8) -- 1.2.SoW-Managing Expectations through Project Life Cycle -- 1.3.Managing Change -- 1.4.Risk Management -- 1.4.1.Risk Management Strategy -- 1.4.2.Sample Risk Management Log, Mitigation Plan, Contingency Plan, and Risk Action Plan -- 2.Requirements Generation -- 2.1.Requirements Source -- 2.2.Requirements Generation Life Cycle -- 2.3.Attributes of Requirements -- 2.4.Process Engineering -- 2.5.Traceability Matrix -- 2.5.1.Requirements Documentation -- 2.6.A Final Comment about Requirements Generation -- 3.Senior Leadership Collaboration Workshop -- 3.1.Rules of Engagement -- 3.1.1.Project Rules of Engagement -- 3.2.High-Level Review of Requirements -- 3.3.Visionary Functionality -- 3.3.1.Projected Future Variance -- 3.3.2.Cost-of-Change Analysis -- 3.3.3.Triggers, Drill-Downs, and Simulations/Projections --
Note continued: 3.4.Align Requirements Traceability to Committed Expected Results and Assign Accountability and Timetable for Achieving Results -- 3.5.Agree upon Measurement Scorecard -- Section I Wrap-Up -- 4.The Information Workmanship Standard -- 4.1.Definition of an IWS -- 4.2.Criteria for an IWS -- 4.3.Performance Measurements for Transactions, Documents, and Files -- 4.4.Job Functions Require an IWS -- 4.4.1.Documents -- 4.4.2.Return-to-Vendor Credit Document -- 4.4.2.1.RTV Credit Document Certification -- 4.5.Data Accuracy -- 4.6.End-to-End Process -- 4.7.Performance Goals and Objectives -- 4.8.Performance Accountability -- 4.9.Managing Performance Expectations -- 4.10.Certification -- 4.11.Systems Champions -- 4.12.Conclusion -- 5.The Conference Room Pilot -- 5.1.Definition of a CRP -- 5.1.1.Test Data Elements and Their Relationships -- 5.1.2.Educate and Train Users -- 5.1.3.Validate Policies -- 5.1.4.Test User Operating Procedures --
Note continued: 5.1.5.Test Issue Resolutions -- 5.1.5.1.Alternative 1 Danger: Change the Current Operating System -- 5.1.5.2.Alternative 2 Danger: Change the Proposed System -- 5.1.5.3.Alternative 3 Danger: Defer Capability to a Later Implementation Phase -- 5.1.6.Try Something New Out for the First Time -- 5.2.Structuring the CRP -- 5.3.Deliverables Resulting from an Effective CRP -- 5.3.1.Statements of Issue Resolution -- 5.3.2.Functional Specification Input Document -- 5.3.3.Validation of Policies and Procedures -- 5.3.4.Software Application Certification -- 5.3.5.Enhancement Shakedown -- 5.3.6.Training prior to Cutover -- 5.4.General Points of Awareness -- 5.5.Conclusion -- 6.Education, Training, and Implementation Framework -- 6.1.Structuring an Education and Training Program -- 6.1.1.Perspective -- 6.1.2.Commitment -- 6.1.3.Setting Goals -- 6.1.4.Achieving Quality Education -- 6.1.5.Planning for New ERP System Education -- 6.1.5.1.The Field -- 6.1.5.2.The What --
Note continued: 6.1.5.3.How -- 6.1.5.4.Timing -- 6.1.5.5.Location -- 6.1.6.Achieving Overall Program Efficiency -- 6.1.6.1.The Education Coordinator -- 6.1.6.2.Selecting Instructors -- 6.1.6.3.Preparing Instructors -- 6.1.6.4.Preparing Students -- 6.1.6.5.Debriefing and Student Evaluation -- 6.1.6.6.Course Preparation -- 6.1.7.Instructional Methods -- 6.1.7.1.Lecture -- 6.1.7.2.Demonstration -- 6.1.7.3.Discussions -- 6.1.7.4.Independent Study -- 6.1.7.5.Lesson -- 6.1.8.Ongoing Education -- 6.2.Implementation Framework -- 6.2.1.Overview -- 6.2.1.1.Project Planning and Control -- 6.2.1.2.Project Budget -- 6.2.1.3.Education Plan -- 6.2.1.4.Implementation Audits -- 6.2.1.5.Implementation Success Factors -- 6.2.1.6.Implementation Plan -- Section II Wrap-Up -- 7.Project Management -- 7.1.Visionary -- 7.2.Innovative -- 7.3.Flexible -- 7.4.Ingenuity -- 7.5.Agile -- 7.6.Exceptional Throughput -- 7.7.Nimble -- 7.8.Project Framework -- 7.8.1.Project Plan --
Note continued: 7.8.2.Documenting AS IS -- 7.8.3.Project Schedule -- 8.Process Performance Management -- 8.1.Definition of Process Performance Management -- 8.2.Criteria for PPM -- 8.3.Job Functions Require a PPM -- 8.3.1.Data Accountability -- 8.3.2.Data Accuracy -- 8.3.3.Best Process Characteristics -- 8.4.Performance Goals and Objectives -- 8.5.Performance Measurements for Optimal "In-the-Trenches" Results -- 8.6.Performance Accountability -- 8.7.Managing Performance Expectations -- 8.8.Process Performance Measurement -- 8.9.Retooling Information Resource Management -- 8.10.Organizational Perspective -- 8.11.Parochial Performance Objectives -- 8.12.A Better Perspective-Value Streaming -- 8.12.1.Activities That Do Not Add Value and Lengthen the Process Time -- 8.12.2.Activities That Do Not Add Value but Perform Control Reviews -- 8.12.3.Activities That Add Value and Are Essential to Ensure Timely Customer Fulfillment --
Note continued: 8.13.Refining, Streamlining, and Reducing Cycle Time -- 8.13.1.Refinement -- 8.13.2.Streamlining -- 8.13.3.Reduced Cycle Time -- 8.14.The "Vision" of the Business Process -- 8.15.Dreaming a Bit -- 8.15.1.Bringing Down the Job Description Walls -- 8.16.How Can a Radical Visionary Begin the Process? -- 8.17.Piloting Change -- 8.17.1.Hierarchical Structures -- 8.17.2.Productivity Incentive -- 8.17.3.Performance Measurements -- 8.18.Future Orientation -- 8.18.1.Lack of Leadership -- 8.18.2.Waste Management -- 8.18.3.Intellectual Energy Conservation -- 8.18.4.Agility Deployment -- 8.19.Developing Action Plans That Deliver Effective and Orderly Change -- 8.20.Prioritizing -- 8.20.1.Attributes of Effective Action Plans -- 8.20.1.1.Ownership -- 8.20.1.2.Flexibility -- 8.20.1.3.Simplicity -- 8.20.1.4.Service -- 8.20.1.5.Responsiveness -- 8.20.1.6.Cost -- 8.21.Emerging Natural Work Teams -- 8.22.Natural Work Teams --
Note continued: 8.22.1.Consultive Review of Process (Independent Observation) -- 8.22.2.Consultation with Natural Work Team Downstream Nested Internal Customer -- 8.22.3.Daily Consultation with Internal Customer Users -- 8.22.4.Debrief with Functional Systems Champion -- 8.23.Process-Based Performance Measurements -- 8.24.Process-Based Performance Management -- 8.25.Performance-Based Compensation -- 8.26.Committing to the Journey -- 9.Snags, Traps, and Black Holes -- 9.1.Software -- 9.1.1.Strategic Concerns -- 9.1.2.Modifications -- 9.1.3.Interfaces and Integrations -- 9.1.4.Customizations -- 9.2.Hardware -- 9.2.1.Business Interruption -- 9.2.2.Backup and Recovery -- 9.2.3.Storage -- 9.2.4.History Retention -- 9.3.Database -- 9.3.1.Database Sizing and Space Allocation -- 9.3.2.Performance Benchmarking and Tuning -- 9.4.Business Process -- 9.4.1.The Big Package Deal -- 9.4.2.Lack of Ownership -- 9.4.3.Cross-Functional, Matrix Management, and Stalls --
Note continued: 9.5.Managing Third-Party Relations and SoW -- 9.6.Portfolio Management -- 9.6.1.Project Management -- 9.6.2.ERP Performance Management -- 9.6.3.Timely Decision Management -- 9.7.Data Accuracy -- 9.8.Resource Commitment Breaches -- 9.9.ERP for the First Time -- 9.10.Miscellaneous -- 9.11.CSFs while Approaching GO LIVE -- 9.12.Stabilization -- 9.13.System Tuning -- 9.14.ROI Tracking -- 10.Conclusion -- Appendix of Terms -- Term Definition -- Appendix A (Chapter 1) -- A.1.Communication Plan -- A.1.1.Communication Strategy -- A.1.2.Purpose -- A.1.3.Objectives -- A.1.4.Format -- A.1.5.Communication Principles -- A.2.Sample Risk Management Log, Mitigation Strategy, and Contingency Plan -- A.3.Sample Risk Action Plan -- Appendix B (Chapter 4) -- B.1.Sample Job Function Information Workmanship Standard -- B.1.1.Receiving Associate -- B.1.1.1.Background -- B.1.2.Information Workmanship Standard -- B.1.2.1.Receiving Memo --
Note continued: B.1.2.2.Material Transfer (Dock-to-Stock) -- B.1.2.3.RTV Shipping Document (RTV Credit) -- B.1.2.4.Receipts-in-Process Locator -- B.1.3.General Accuracy Guideline -- B.1.4.Departmental Certification -- B.1.5.Recertification -- B.2.Sample Department IWS -- B.2.1.Material Management Department -- B.2.1.1.Background -- B.2.2.Information Workmanship Standard -- B.2.3.Certification -- B.3.Sample IWS Written Exam -- Appendix C (Chapter 5) -- C.1.Sample Education and Training Matrices -- C.1.1.Organizational Function versus Business Process Matrix -- C.1.2.Individual by Transaction/Feature Matrix -- C.1.3.Transaction/Feature by Session Matrix -- C.2.Example of a Conference Room Pilot -- C.2.1.Overview -- C.2.2.Session Deliverables -- C.2.3.CBS Conference Room Pilot Guidelines -- C.2.4.CBS CRP Scenarios -- Appendix D (Chapter 6) -- D.1.Education Matrix Forms -- D.1.2.Organizational Function versus Business Process Matrix --
Note continued: D.2.Procedures Training and Education Planning Matrices -- D.3.Developing Objectives and System Measures -- D.4.Cutover Checklist for a Formal ERP System -- D.5.Start-Up Final Checklist -- D.6.ERP Implementation Guide -- D.6.1.Introduction -- D.6.2.Overview of a Successful ERP Project -- D.6.3.General Considerations for Systems Design -- D.6.4.Maximize the Benefits from Using the Checklist -- D.6.5.Module Checklist -- D.6.5.1.Item and Product Structure -- D.6.5.2.Inventory -- D.6.5.3.Forms -- D.6.5.4.Purchasing -- D.6.5.5.Sales Order Entry -- D.6.5.6.Master Scheduling -- D.6.5.7.Work Orders -- D.6.5.8.Work Center/Router -- D.6.5.9.Material Requirements Planning -- D.6.5.10.Cost Accounting -- D.6.5.11.Outside Processing -- D.6.5.12.Purchase Requisition -- D.6.5.13.Vendor Supplied Material -- D.6.5.14.Tooling Control -- D.6.5.15.Product Change/New Product -- D.6.5.16.Example of a Module Checklist -- D.6.5.17."Blank" Module Checklist Form --
Note continued: D.7.Sample Questions Asked When Reviewing Operational Documents for Procedural Impact -- D.8.Questions for Review When Formalizing a Cost Accounting System -- Appendix E (Chapter 7) -- E.1.Project Core Team Members' Roles and Responsibility Matrix (RACI) -- E.2.Sample High-Level Project Schedule -- E.3.Sample Requirements Tracking -- E.3.1.Completed by Phase -- E.3.2.Completed by Team -- E.4.Sample Integrated Data Environment Report Diagram -- E.5.Sample Data Mapping Form -- E.6.Sample Milestone Progress Report -- F.1.Overarching Goal of Project Success.
Summary: Although many books outline approaches for successful ERP implementations, the data shows that most ERP efforts yield minimal return on investment (ROI), with most projects failing. Directing the ERP Implementation: A Best Practice Guide to Avoiding Program Failure Traps While Tuning System Performance supplies best practices along with a proven roadmap for improving the odds of system implementation success. By adhering to the time-tested framework outlined in the book, your organization will be able to commit to the precepts and practices that lead to successful implementations. Supplying an innovative and fast-track, yet comprehensive, approach to ERP implementation success, the book provides practical guidance to help executive leadership do the right things along the ERP journey. Explains how to engineer a project plan, generate requirements, and obtain a results-oriented commitment Details the practical deployment framework essential for success and includes a variety of tools to position an organization for success Describes how to ensure proactive involvement by the project team, executive sponsors, stakeholders, and working-level systems champions Highlighting the essential planning ingredients that are frequently omitted from ERP implementation start-ups, the book provides readers with the planning framework and proven foundational methods and principles to ensure smooth planning and systems deployment, product quality, and maximum ROI. The book covers everything from software selection and integration to common snags, traps, and black holes. Best practice tool sets include proven methods such as information workmanship standard, which defines quality; conference room piloting, which assists in matching teams to objectives seamlessly; education, training, and implementation framework, which addresses preparing the operating production environment; and project monitoring and deployment, covering project and risk management.Summary: DESCRIPCIÓN EN ESPAÑOL| Aunque muchos libros describen enfoques para implementaciones de ERP exitosas, los datos muestran que la mayoría de los esfuerzos de ERP producen un retorno de la inversión (ROI) mínimo, y la mayoría de los proyectos fracasan. Dirigir la implementación de ERP: una guía de mejores prácticas para evitar trampas de fallas del programa mientras se ajusta el rendimiento del sistema proporciona las mejores prácticas junto con una hoja de ruta comprobada para mejorar las probabilidades de éxito en la implementación del sistema. Al adherirse al marco probado en el tiempo descrito en el libro, su organización podrá comprometerse con los preceptos y prácticas que conducen a implementaciones exitosas. Al proporcionar un enfoque innovador y acelerado, pero completo, para el éxito de la implementación de ERP, el libro proporciona una guía práctica para ayudar a los líderes ejecutivos a hacer lo correcto a lo largo del viaje de ERP. Explica cómo diseñar un plan de proyecto, generar requisitos y obtener un compromiso orientado a resultados. Detalla el marco práctico de implementación esencial para el éxito e incluye una variedad de herramientas para posicionar una organización para el éxito Describe cómo garantizar la participación proactiva del equipo del proyecto, los patrocinadores ejecutivos, las partes interesadas y los defensores de los sistemas a nivel de trabajo. Destacando los ingredientes esenciales de la planificación que con frecuencia se omiten en las puestas en marcha de la implementación de ERP, el libro proporciona a los lectores el marco de planificación y los métodos y principios fundamentales probados para garantizar una planificación y una implementación de sistemas fluidas, la calidad del producto y el máximo retorno de la inversión. El libro cubre todo, desde la selección e integración de software hasta inconvenientes, trampas y agujeros negros comunes. Los conjuntos de herramientas de mejores prácticas incluyen métodos probados como el estándar de mano de obra de la información, que define la calidad; pilotaje de salas de conferencias, que ayuda a hacer coincidir los equipos con los objetivos sin problemas; marco de educación, capacitación e implementación, que aborda la preparación del entorno de producción operativo; y seguimiento y despliegue de proyectos, que abarca la gestión de proyectos y riesgos.
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Item type Current library Home library Collection Call number Copy number Status Notes Date due Barcode Item holds
Libros para consulta en sala Libros para consulta en sala Biblioteca Antonio Enriquez Savignac Biblioteca Antonio Enriquez Savignac COLECCIÓN RESERVA T 58.6 P45 2015 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Ejem.1 No para préstamo (Préstamo interno) Ingeniería en Datos e Inteligencia Organizacional 042802
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Machine generated contents note: 1.Creating a Project Plan -- 1.1.Planning Roadmap of Deliverables -- 1.1.1.High-Level Acceptance Criteria (Acceptl) -- 1.1.2.End-Point System Expected Results (ToBeResult2) -- 1.1.3.Rules of Engagement (RulesOfEngage3) -- 1.1.4.Risk Management Plan (RiskMgmt4) -- 1.1.5.Quality Assurance Plan (QA5) -- 1.1.6.Requirements Management Plan (RqmtsMgmt6) -- 1.1.7.Configuration Management Plan (CM7) -- 1.1.8.Training Plan (TrainingPln8) -- 1.1.9.Collaboration Coordination Plan (CollabCoord9) -- 1.1.10.Project Health Reporting Plan (ProjHealth10) -- 1.1.11.User/System Documentation Plan (UserDoc11) -- 1.1.12.Knowledge Transfer Plan (KT12) -- 1.1.13.Communication Plan (Comm13) -- 1.1.14.Plan for Reviews (Toll Gates) and Walkthroughs (TollGatel4) -- 1.1.15.Contractor Agreement Management Plan (CAM15) -- 1.1.16.Test Strategy (Testingl6) -- 1.1.17.Business Information Assurance Plans (BIA17) -- 1.1.17.1.Information Systems Continuity Plan --

Note continued: 1.1.17.2.Fault-Tolerant Plan -- 1.1.18.Software Implementation Strategy (SWImplel8) -- 1.2.SoW-Managing Expectations through Project Life Cycle -- 1.3.Managing Change -- 1.4.Risk Management -- 1.4.1.Risk Management Strategy -- 1.4.2.Sample Risk Management Log, Mitigation Plan, Contingency Plan, and Risk Action Plan -- 2.Requirements Generation -- 2.1.Requirements Source -- 2.2.Requirements Generation Life Cycle -- 2.3.Attributes of Requirements -- 2.4.Process Engineering -- 2.5.Traceability Matrix -- 2.5.1.Requirements Documentation -- 2.6.A Final Comment about Requirements Generation -- 3.Senior Leadership Collaboration Workshop -- 3.1.Rules of Engagement -- 3.1.1.Project Rules of Engagement -- 3.2.High-Level Review of Requirements -- 3.3.Visionary Functionality -- 3.3.1.Projected Future Variance -- 3.3.2.Cost-of-Change Analysis -- 3.3.3.Triggers, Drill-Downs, and Simulations/Projections --

Note continued: 3.4.Align Requirements Traceability to Committed Expected Results and Assign Accountability and Timetable for Achieving Results -- 3.5.Agree upon Measurement Scorecard -- Section I Wrap-Up -- 4.The Information Workmanship Standard -- 4.1.Definition of an IWS -- 4.2.Criteria for an IWS -- 4.3.Performance Measurements for Transactions, Documents, and Files -- 4.4.Job Functions Require an IWS -- 4.4.1.Documents -- 4.4.2.Return-to-Vendor Credit Document -- 4.4.2.1.RTV Credit Document Certification -- 4.5.Data Accuracy -- 4.6.End-to-End Process -- 4.7.Performance Goals and Objectives -- 4.8.Performance Accountability -- 4.9.Managing Performance Expectations -- 4.10.Certification -- 4.11.Systems Champions -- 4.12.Conclusion -- 5.The Conference Room Pilot -- 5.1.Definition of a CRP -- 5.1.1.Test Data Elements and Their Relationships -- 5.1.2.Educate and Train Users -- 5.1.3.Validate Policies -- 5.1.4.Test User Operating Procedures --

Note continued: 5.1.5.Test Issue Resolutions -- 5.1.5.1.Alternative 1 Danger: Change the Current Operating System -- 5.1.5.2.Alternative 2 Danger: Change the Proposed System -- 5.1.5.3.Alternative 3 Danger: Defer Capability to a Later Implementation Phase -- 5.1.6.Try Something New Out for the First Time -- 5.2.Structuring the CRP -- 5.3.Deliverables Resulting from an Effective CRP -- 5.3.1.Statements of Issue Resolution -- 5.3.2.Functional Specification Input Document -- 5.3.3.Validation of Policies and Procedures -- 5.3.4.Software Application Certification -- 5.3.5.Enhancement Shakedown -- 5.3.6.Training prior to Cutover -- 5.4.General Points of Awareness -- 5.5.Conclusion -- 6.Education, Training, and Implementation Framework -- 6.1.Structuring an Education and Training Program -- 6.1.1.Perspective -- 6.1.2.Commitment -- 6.1.3.Setting Goals -- 6.1.4.Achieving Quality Education -- 6.1.5.Planning for New ERP System Education -- 6.1.5.1.The Field -- 6.1.5.2.The What --

Note continued: 6.1.5.3.How -- 6.1.5.4.Timing -- 6.1.5.5.Location -- 6.1.6.Achieving Overall Program Efficiency -- 6.1.6.1.The Education Coordinator -- 6.1.6.2.Selecting Instructors -- 6.1.6.3.Preparing Instructors -- 6.1.6.4.Preparing Students -- 6.1.6.5.Debriefing and Student Evaluation -- 6.1.6.6.Course Preparation -- 6.1.7.Instructional Methods -- 6.1.7.1.Lecture -- 6.1.7.2.Demonstration -- 6.1.7.3.Discussions -- 6.1.7.4.Independent Study -- 6.1.7.5.Lesson -- 6.1.8.Ongoing Education -- 6.2.Implementation Framework -- 6.2.1.Overview -- 6.2.1.1.Project Planning and Control -- 6.2.1.2.Project Budget -- 6.2.1.3.Education Plan -- 6.2.1.4.Implementation Audits -- 6.2.1.5.Implementation Success Factors -- 6.2.1.6.Implementation Plan -- Section II Wrap-Up -- 7.Project Management -- 7.1.Visionary -- 7.2.Innovative -- 7.3.Flexible -- 7.4.Ingenuity -- 7.5.Agile -- 7.6.Exceptional Throughput -- 7.7.Nimble -- 7.8.Project Framework -- 7.8.1.Project Plan --

Note continued: 7.8.2.Documenting AS IS -- 7.8.3.Project Schedule -- 8.Process Performance Management -- 8.1.Definition of Process Performance Management -- 8.2.Criteria for PPM -- 8.3.Job Functions Require a PPM -- 8.3.1.Data Accountability -- 8.3.2.Data Accuracy -- 8.3.3.Best Process Characteristics -- 8.4.Performance Goals and Objectives -- 8.5.Performance Measurements for Optimal "In-the-Trenches" Results -- 8.6.Performance Accountability -- 8.7.Managing Performance Expectations -- 8.8.Process Performance Measurement -- 8.9.Retooling Information Resource Management -- 8.10.Organizational Perspective -- 8.11.Parochial Performance Objectives -- 8.12.A Better Perspective-Value Streaming -- 8.12.1.Activities That Do Not Add Value and Lengthen the Process Time -- 8.12.2.Activities That Do Not Add Value but Perform Control Reviews -- 8.12.3.Activities That Add Value and Are Essential to Ensure Timely Customer Fulfillment --

Note continued: 8.13.Refining, Streamlining, and Reducing Cycle Time -- 8.13.1.Refinement -- 8.13.2.Streamlining -- 8.13.3.Reduced Cycle Time -- 8.14.The "Vision" of the Business Process -- 8.15.Dreaming a Bit -- 8.15.1.Bringing Down the Job Description Walls -- 8.16.How Can a Radical Visionary Begin the Process? -- 8.17.Piloting Change -- 8.17.1.Hierarchical Structures -- 8.17.2.Productivity Incentive -- 8.17.3.Performance Measurements -- 8.18.Future Orientation -- 8.18.1.Lack of Leadership -- 8.18.2.Waste Management -- 8.18.3.Intellectual Energy Conservation -- 8.18.4.Agility Deployment -- 8.19.Developing Action Plans That Deliver Effective and Orderly Change -- 8.20.Prioritizing -- 8.20.1.Attributes of Effective Action Plans -- 8.20.1.1.Ownership -- 8.20.1.2.Flexibility -- 8.20.1.3.Simplicity -- 8.20.1.4.Service -- 8.20.1.5.Responsiveness -- 8.20.1.6.Cost -- 8.21.Emerging Natural Work Teams -- 8.22.Natural Work Teams --

Note continued: 8.22.1.Consultive Review of Process (Independent Observation) -- 8.22.2.Consultation with Natural Work Team Downstream Nested Internal Customer -- 8.22.3.Daily Consultation with Internal Customer Users -- 8.22.4.Debrief with Functional Systems Champion -- 8.23.Process-Based Performance Measurements -- 8.24.Process-Based Performance Management -- 8.25.Performance-Based Compensation -- 8.26.Committing to the Journey -- 9.Snags, Traps, and Black Holes -- 9.1.Software -- 9.1.1.Strategic Concerns -- 9.1.2.Modifications -- 9.1.3.Interfaces and Integrations -- 9.1.4.Customizations -- 9.2.Hardware -- 9.2.1.Business Interruption -- 9.2.2.Backup and Recovery -- 9.2.3.Storage -- 9.2.4.History Retention -- 9.3.Database -- 9.3.1.Database Sizing and Space Allocation -- 9.3.2.Performance Benchmarking and Tuning -- 9.4.Business Process -- 9.4.1.The Big Package Deal -- 9.4.2.Lack of Ownership -- 9.4.3.Cross-Functional, Matrix Management, and Stalls --

Note continued: 9.5.Managing Third-Party Relations and SoW -- 9.6.Portfolio Management -- 9.6.1.Project Management -- 9.6.2.ERP Performance Management -- 9.6.3.Timely Decision Management -- 9.7.Data Accuracy -- 9.8.Resource Commitment Breaches -- 9.9.ERP for the First Time -- 9.10.Miscellaneous -- 9.11.CSFs while Approaching GO LIVE -- 9.12.Stabilization -- 9.13.System Tuning -- 9.14.ROI Tracking -- 10.Conclusion -- Appendix of Terms -- Term Definition -- Appendix A (Chapter 1) -- A.1.Communication Plan -- A.1.1.Communication Strategy -- A.1.2.Purpose -- A.1.3.Objectives -- A.1.4.Format -- A.1.5.Communication Principles -- A.2.Sample Risk Management Log, Mitigation Strategy, and Contingency Plan -- A.3.Sample Risk Action Plan -- Appendix B (Chapter 4) -- B.1.Sample Job Function Information Workmanship Standard -- B.1.1.Receiving Associate -- B.1.1.1.Background -- B.1.2.Information Workmanship Standard -- B.1.2.1.Receiving Memo --

Note continued: B.1.2.2.Material Transfer (Dock-to-Stock) -- B.1.2.3.RTV Shipping Document (RTV Credit) -- B.1.2.4.Receipts-in-Process Locator -- B.1.3.General Accuracy Guideline -- B.1.4.Departmental Certification -- B.1.5.Recertification -- B.2.Sample Department IWS -- B.2.1.Material Management Department -- B.2.1.1.Background -- B.2.2.Information Workmanship Standard -- B.2.3.Certification -- B.3.Sample IWS Written Exam -- Appendix C (Chapter 5) -- C.1.Sample Education and Training Matrices -- C.1.1.Organizational Function versus Business Process Matrix -- C.1.2.Individual by Transaction/Feature Matrix -- C.1.3.Transaction/Feature by Session Matrix -- C.2.Example of a Conference Room Pilot -- C.2.1.Overview -- C.2.2.Session Deliverables -- C.2.3.CBS Conference Room Pilot Guidelines -- C.2.4.CBS CRP Scenarios -- Appendix D (Chapter 6) -- D.1.Education Matrix Forms -- D.1.2.Organizational Function versus Business Process Matrix --

Note continued: D.2.Procedures Training and Education Planning Matrices -- D.3.Developing Objectives and System Measures -- D.4.Cutover Checklist for a Formal ERP System -- D.5.Start-Up Final Checklist -- D.6.ERP Implementation Guide -- D.6.1.Introduction -- D.6.2.Overview of a Successful ERP Project -- D.6.3.General Considerations for Systems Design -- D.6.4.Maximize the Benefits from Using the Checklist -- D.6.5.Module Checklist -- D.6.5.1.Item and Product Structure -- D.6.5.2.Inventory -- D.6.5.3.Forms -- D.6.5.4.Purchasing -- D.6.5.5.Sales Order Entry -- D.6.5.6.Master Scheduling -- D.6.5.7.Work Orders -- D.6.5.8.Work Center/Router -- D.6.5.9.Material Requirements Planning -- D.6.5.10.Cost Accounting -- D.6.5.11.Outside Processing -- D.6.5.12.Purchase Requisition -- D.6.5.13.Vendor Supplied Material -- D.6.5.14.Tooling Control -- D.6.5.15.Product Change/New Product -- D.6.5.16.Example of a Module Checklist -- D.6.5.17."Blank" Module Checklist Form --

Note continued: D.7.Sample Questions Asked When Reviewing Operational Documents for Procedural Impact -- D.8.Questions for Review When Formalizing a Cost Accounting System -- Appendix E (Chapter 7) -- E.1.Project Core Team Members' Roles and Responsibility Matrix (RACI) -- E.2.Sample High-Level Project Schedule -- E.3.Sample Requirements Tracking -- E.3.1.Completed by Phase -- E.3.2.Completed by Team -- E.4.Sample Integrated Data Environment Report Diagram -- E.5.Sample Data Mapping Form -- E.6.Sample Milestone Progress Report -- F.1.Overarching Goal of Project Success.

Although many books outline approaches for successful ERP implementations, the data shows that most ERP efforts yield minimal return on investment (ROI), with most projects failing. Directing the ERP Implementation: A Best Practice Guide to Avoiding Program Failure Traps While Tuning System Performance supplies best practices along with a proven roadmap for improving the odds of system implementation success.

By adhering to the time-tested framework outlined in the book, your organization will be able to commit to the precepts and practices that lead to successful implementations. Supplying an innovative and fast-track, yet comprehensive, approach to ERP implementation success, the book provides practical guidance to help executive leadership do the right things along the ERP journey.

Explains how to engineer a project plan, generate requirements, and obtain a results-oriented commitment
Details the practical deployment framework essential for success and includes a variety of tools to position an organization for success
Describes how to ensure proactive involvement by the project team, executive sponsors, stakeholders, and working-level systems champions
Highlighting the essential planning ingredients that are frequently omitted from ERP implementation start-ups, the book provides readers with the planning framework and proven foundational methods and principles to ensure smooth planning and systems deployment, product quality, and maximum ROI.

The book covers everything from software selection and integration to common snags, traps, and black holes. Best practice tool sets include proven methods such as information workmanship standard, which defines quality; conference room piloting, which assists in matching teams to objectives seamlessly; education, training, and implementation framework, which addresses preparing the operating production environment; and project monitoring and deployment, covering project and risk management.

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Aunque muchos libros describen enfoques para implementaciones de ERP exitosas, los datos muestran que la mayoría de los esfuerzos de ERP producen un retorno de la inversión (ROI) mínimo, y la mayoría de los proyectos fracasan. Dirigir la implementación de ERP: una guía de mejores prácticas para evitar trampas de fallas del programa mientras se ajusta el rendimiento del sistema proporciona las mejores prácticas junto con una hoja de ruta comprobada para mejorar las probabilidades de éxito en la implementación del sistema.

Al adherirse al marco probado en el tiempo descrito en el libro, su organización podrá comprometerse con los preceptos y prácticas que conducen a implementaciones exitosas. Al proporcionar un enfoque innovador y acelerado, pero completo, para el éxito de la implementación de ERP, el libro proporciona una guía práctica para ayudar a los líderes ejecutivos a hacer lo correcto a lo largo del viaje de ERP.

Explica cómo diseñar un plan de proyecto, generar requisitos y obtener un compromiso orientado a resultados.
Detalla el marco práctico de implementación esencial para el éxito e incluye una variedad de herramientas para posicionar una organización para el éxito
Describe cómo garantizar la participación proactiva del equipo del proyecto, los patrocinadores ejecutivos, las partes interesadas y los defensores de los sistemas a nivel de trabajo.
Destacando los ingredientes esenciales de la planificación que con frecuencia se omiten en las puestas en marcha de la implementación de ERP, el libro proporciona a los lectores el marco de planificación y los métodos y principios fundamentales probados para garantizar una planificación y una implementación de sistemas fluidas, la calidad del producto y el máximo retorno de la inversión.

El libro cubre todo, desde la selección e integración de software hasta inconvenientes, trampas y agujeros negros comunes. Los conjuntos de herramientas de mejores prácticas incluyen métodos probados como el estándar de mano de obra de la información, que define la calidad; pilotaje de salas de conferencias, que ayuda a hacer coincidir los equipos con los objetivos sin problemas; marco de educación, capacitación e implementación, que aborda la preparación del entorno de producción operativo; y seguimiento y despliegue de proyectos, que abarca la gestión de proyectos y riesgos.

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